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Greenmeadows New World Supermarket, Napier

Where are the sawcuts? There aren't any! Following a fact finding mission to the US, New World and their consultant partners developed an all-new flooring specification for their Greenmeadows store in the Hawkes Bay.

This innovative specification had four key components;

  • Post-tensioned Slab - so no sawcuts required
  • Coloured - to enhance the customer experience
  • Light salt & pepper grind - for durability and flatness
  • Floor hardener and sealer

Client: Foodstuffs Properties (Wgtn) Limited
Architect: Shaun Thompson Gray, Architecture HDT Ltd
Contractor: Mainzeal
Flooring subcontractor: Conslab
Concrete Supplier: Allied Concrete


This project consisted of a new building with a total floor area of 3852m2 as well as a mezzanine floor designed away from the old uniform New World design to a completely new image. Greenmeadows New World opened its doors to a keenly awaiting public in January 2009. The new building provides the Foodstuffs group with a fantastic asset - showing the public just what New World can achieve. The success of the project is a credit to the clients for their clarity of vision, and is a great example of successful collaborative relationships bringing about enriched design.

The use of a more natural flooring material and warmer colours together with a sophisticated material palette provides shoppers with a relaxed and inviting environment. The concrete floor was a key component of that, and the innovative specification came about following a fact finding mission to the US by both Foodstuffs staff and their consultants. This provided four primary ideas for the specification;

  1. Post tensioned floor slab - The floor slab, constricted by Conslab, provides a joint free finish which means the likely long term maintenance on the slab is heavily reduced. Post tensioning is a system that in essence squeezes the edges of the slab and so assisting the slab with it's natural shrinkage process, and thus eliminating the need for sawcuts. A key consideration in the design process is the movement of the slab and involves ensuring that penetrations through the slab can be isolated.
  2. Colour - Peter Fell colour 334 was chosen to lift the appearance and contribute to the overall aesthetic.
  3. Salt and Pepper grind - a light grind was used to ensure flatness and increase the durability
  4. Sealer - the Retroplate system was used to densify and seal the floor. There was some discussion around slip resistance but this was resolved successfully.

Due to poor ground conditions, approximately 450 timber piles were needed to be driven into the ground to support the structure and floor slab. In-situ concrete foundations support precast panels, columns and structural steel frames with a Longrun Dimond 630 Roof which was run on site due to the roof sheet lengths.

The fitout was undertaken with standard framing, wall linings, solid doors and painting. The front entry to the store is through a rotunda-shaped structure with a lot of natural lighting that houses a Café.

Special attention was given to the bespoke lighting system that highlights displays & products while providing a pleasant atmosphere for shoppers.

More info can be seen at the following websites:

http://hdt.co.nz/r/greenmeadows.html

http://www.mainzeal.co.nz/PortfolioCentralRegion/tabid/179/agentType/View/PropertyID/52/Default.aspx

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